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Blake I. Collier | The Dirty Deacon

Contributor for Mockingbird | Co-creator of Son of Byford | Contributor for Christ & Pop Culture
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Wovenhand

deathwishinc:

Wovenhand “Refractory Obdurate” 12”LP/CD details revealed, in stores April 29th

Brought to you by a partnership of Deathwish and Glitterhouse Records, release dates are as follows:

April 29th: Deathwish Release Date (World)

April 25th: Glitterhouse Release Date (Europe)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

Wovenhand is a band led by dedicated life-musician and lyricist, David Eugene Edwards. Over the last two decades, his prolific work in both Wovenhand and the legendary 16 Horsepower has influenced and inspired a generation of musicians throughout the expansive alternative music world. 

Wovenhand cannot be described in traditional terms. Their sound is an organic, weavework of neo-folk, post rock, punk, old-time, and alternative sounds. All coming together as a vehicle for David’s soulful expression and constant spiritual self exploration. Sometimes sad and sorrowed and at other times uplifting, Wovenhand are always unforgettable in spirit and sound. 

"Refractory Obdurate" is the latest album from Wovenhand. Joining David on this album are longtime percussionist Ordy Garrison, along with musicians Chuck French and Neil Keener (Planes Mistaken For Stars, Git Some).    

"Refractory Obdurate" is a moving masterwork that shows Wovenhand exploring louder roots hinted at on prior albums. As they maintain their melodious course, "Good Shepherd", "Field of Hedon", and "Hiss", stomp forth with a newly amplified punk rock heart.  While "The Refractory", "Salome", and "Obdurate Obscura" each ascend epically into a multi-layered haze. Ten songs in all, "Refractory Obdurate" plays as a beautifully crafted patchwork that transcends genres and expectation; a true artistic achievement, that only Wovenhand could offer.

Track Listing:

01. Corsicana Clip

02. Masonic Youth

03. The Refractory

04. Good Shepherd

05. Salome

06. King David

07. Field of Hedon

08. Obdurate Obscura

09. Hiss

10. El-bow

Photo by Erwin Verstappen

I never thought I would want to hear DEE breakout into full rock furiousness, but the man pulls it off without betraying what Wovenhand is all about.

For Your Information: Bands That Severely Influenced My Musical Tastes 

#5

Wovenhand

Discography:

Woven Hand (2002)
Consider The Birds (2004)
Mosaic (2006)
Ten Stones (2008)
The Threshingfloor (2010)
The Laughing Stalk (2012)
Refractory Obdurate (2014)

Contemporary Ballet Soundtracks:

Blush Music (2003)
Puur (2006)

Live:

Live at Roepaen (2012)

Those of you who know me personally know that I am not the Christmas holiday’s number one fan.  For those just meeting me, just know that I identify with The Grinch from Dr. Suess’ beloved Christmas tale only when his heart was two sizes too small.  I am a grinch, there is no doubt about this, but I accept it and embrace it.  It’s not that I hate the meaning behind Christmas, for I am sinful beggar whose only hope was in the whooping cry of that God-man infant, but I don’t like what it has come to mean in this country and I don’t like the bullshit that surrounds it all.  Especially the music.  I enjoy my Thanksgiving bird and then prepare myself for the next day when all of the stores start up their Kenny G Christmas playlists.  Uh uh, I can’t do it.  So I decided to make a two part mix of music that has the scent of Christmas, but nothing more.  It’s merely implied.  I am more interested in the idea of winter containing the darkest night of the year and then the waxing light as we head into the springtime.  I think that is the perfect image of Christmastime with man coming into his darkest night, only to have an infant come into the world and release the gradual night-killing light into the world.  That’s what Christmas means to me.  Screw Santa Claus, he “never meant shit to me, you see.  Straight up racist that sucker was, simple and plain.”  He’s no better than the NSA creeping on your phone conversations.  The real meaning of Christmas is dropping the naughty/nice paradigm and gettin’ some grace fo’ yo’ face.
So download and enjoy this simple offering.  And have a blessed coming of Christ.
Son of Byford + The Sacred Let Down Presents: 2 Sizes 2 Small - [MP3] or [AAC]
[Side A] - Tracklisting
1. “O Come O Come Emmanuel” - Bifrost Arts2. “Immigrant Song” - Atticus Ross, Karen O & Trent Reznor3. “A Christmas F**king Miracle” - Run the Jewels4. “Not Dark Yet” - Silversun Pickups5. “Redemption Sound” - The Builders and The Butchers6. “Glacial” - Hammock7. “Winter Shaker” - Wovenhand8. “This is War” - Dustin Kensrue
[Side B] - Tracklisting
1. “Born in Bethlehem, and he shall send them one by one” - Listener & DJ Dust2. “Who Took the Merry Out of Christmas” - The Staple Singers3. “Ain’t No Chimneys in the Projects” - Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings4. “Christmas in the City” - Marvin Gaye5. “Winter Man” - Clarence Reid6. “Mary’s Baby” - Charles Bradley7. “Where Would We Be Without Christmas?” - Cold War Kids8. “New Year’s Resolution” - Otis Redding & Carla Thomas9. “That leaf sure is heavy, But you have to turn it over” - Listener & DJ Dust

Those of you who know me personally know that I am not the Christmas holiday’s number one fan.  For those just meeting me, just know that I identify with The Grinch from Dr. Suess’ beloved Christmas tale only when his heart was two sizes too small.  I am a grinch, there is no doubt about this, but I accept it and embrace it.  It’s not that I hate the meaning behind Christmas, for I am sinful beggar whose only hope was in the whooping cry of that God-man infant, but I don’t like what it has come to mean in this country and I don’t like the bullshit that surrounds it all.  Especially the music.  I enjoy my Thanksgiving bird and then prepare myself for the next day when all of the stores start up their Kenny G Christmas playlists.  Uh uh, I can’t do it.  So I decided to make a two part mix of music that has the scent of Christmas, but nothing more.  It’s merely implied.  I am more interested in the idea of winter containing the darkest night of the year and then the waxing light as we head into the springtime.  I think that is the perfect image of Christmastime with man coming into his darkest night, only to have an infant come into the world and release the gradual night-killing light into the world.  That’s what Christmas means to me.  Screw Santa Claus, he “never meant shit to me, you see.  Straight up racist that sucker was, simple and plain.”  He’s no better than the NSA creeping on your phone conversations.  The real meaning of Christmas is dropping the naughty/nice paradigm and gettin’ some grace fo’ yo’ face.

So download and enjoy this simple offering.  And have a blessed coming of Christ.

Son of Byford + The Sacred Let Down Presents: 2 Sizes 2 Small - [MP3] or [AAC]

[Side A] - Tracklisting

1. “O Come O Come Emmanuel” - Bifrost Arts
2. “Immigrant Song” - Atticus Ross, Karen O & Trent Reznor
3. “A Christmas F**king Miracle” - Run the Jewels
4. “Not Dark Yet” - Silversun Pickups
5. “Redemption Sound” - The Builders and The Butchers
6. “Glacial” - Hammock
7. “Winter Shaker” - Wovenhand
8. “This is War” - Dustin Kensrue

[Side B] - Tracklisting

1. “Born in Bethlehem, and he shall send them one by one” - Listener & DJ Dust
2. “Who Took the Merry Out of Christmas” - The Staple Singers
3. “Ain’t No Chimneys in the Projects” - Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings
4. “Christmas in the City” - Marvin Gaye
5. “Winter Man” - Clarence Reid
6. “Mary’s Baby” - Charles Bradley
7. “Where Would We Be Without Christmas?” - Cold War Kids
8. “New Year’s Resolution” - Otis Redding & Carla Thomas
9. “That leaf sure is heavy, But you have to turn it over” - Listener & DJ Dust

The song that made Bill Withers a known person in my life…

…and the cover that made me love David Eugene Edwards.

Another post up at Mockingbird.  Come read about the incredible music of David Eugene Edwards and what he has to say about the requirements God demands in his Law and how we cannot live up to them.  And about the grace that comes in when we finally come to that realization.  While you are there, check out the other excellent posts from the contributors at Mockingbird!
16 Horsepower Grace and the Music of David Eugene Edwards

Another post up at Mockingbird.  Come read about the incredible music of David Eugene Edwards and what he has to say about the requirements God demands in his Law and how we cannot live up to them.  And about the grace that comes in when we finally come to that realization.  While you are there, check out the other excellent posts from the contributors at Mockingbird!

16 Horsepower Grace and the Music of David Eugene Edwards

Top Ten Best Albums (That I Got to Listen to Outside of My Year of Gothic Americana) 

It is hard to keep up with new releases when you are devouring a whole genre of music for the year, so this list is by no means exhaustive or, probably, completely accurate, but these are the albums that caught my attention outside of my genre listening for the year.  There are probably several other albums that deserve to be on this list and maybe they will be…in like 15 years.

(in no particular order)

1. El-P, Cancer 4 Cure 

From Company Flow to his solo work, El-Producto is easily one of the best hip/hop producers out there and his flows get better as he gets older.  This is easily his best solo work to date.  The beats are sick and spacey as all of El-P’s best work is.  Roll down the windows and pump up the volume as you pass and throw the bird at the cops.

2. The Heavy, The Glorious Dead. 

The Heavy is easily one of the best modern descendants of soul and funk music.  They became household names with their single, “How You Like Me Now,” but this album improves on their formula and turns in another quality album.  Gotta love the horns on some of the tracks as well.

3. Killer Mike, R. A. P. Music 

I knew nothing of or about Killer Mike before I picked up this album.  I found out that it was produced by El-P and that is enough to make me buy an album right there.  It is undeniably El-P’s produced sound, but Killer Mike’s flows provide a new rhythm to the beats that wouldn’t be found on an El-P album.  Strong album; making me want to check out Killer Mike’s other work.

4. The Gaslight Anthem, Handwritten 

This album tore my life apart when I first heard it.  I was a fan of The Gaslight Anthem after their last album hit the stores, but this, this album kills it.  The deluxe version adds to the excellence with their covers of Nirvana’s “Sliver” and Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers’ “You Got Lucky.”  Brian Fallon’s gritty vocals and mixture of nostalgia and modern-day relevance is unparalleled, especially as he intentionally backed away from his usual narrative driven stories.

5. Wovenhand, The Laughing Stalk 

Easily one of the best gothic americana bands I listened to this year, unfortunately this album was made in late 2012 after my schedule was already set for the year.  This would have easily ended up on the top ten gothic americana albums for the year.  David Eugene Edwards is a beast in his compositions and his earnest and creative lyrics.  A solid offering from one of my favorite singer-songwriters.

6. Theory Hazit, Thr3e 

Theory Hazit is solid hip/hop both on the turntable and on the mic.  He is also a solid example of what could happen when Christians actually pay attention to their craft instead of creating sub-culture propaganda.  Excellent samples in here and some catchy hooks.  Not only that but the commentary within is heartbreakingly honest and sincere.  Some of Hazit’s best work to date.

7. Thrice, Anthology 

As I painfully mourned the hiatus of Thrice, my favorite band, their fans were rewarded with a final release (for the foreseeable future) of live tracks from their final tour as a band.  They left all of the tracks raw with as little tweaking as possible and their whole catalog is covered in this wonderful double disc album.  Brings tears to my eyes every time I listen to it.  Powerful compositions and lyrical content is the name of the game for Thrice and this shows how solid they were in their live performances.

8. Ascend The Hill, O Ransomed Son 

Easily the only praise/worship band I can stand to listen to past one time around.  Ascend the Hill pays attention to their musical compositions and create some powerful and atmospheric music, none more than this album.  Their best, and darkest, effort to date.  It makes it just that much better that Dustin Kensrue, of Thrice, makes an appearance on the album as well.  If you want worship music that is listenable beyond a Sunday morning than these are the guys for you.

9. Propaganda, Excellent 

Not only is this the best effort by a Christian hip/hop artist to date, but Propaganda was able to cause some controversy within the Christian community with this release which means that he is doing something right and being prophetic with his flows (which has always been in the nature of hip/hop music).  However, the controversy narrows the focus to only one song, which, admittedly, is stellar (“Precious Puritans”), but the whole album is a unit and a solid one at that.  No one can counter Propaganda’s voice when they listen to the humility and honesty that comes from each one of these tracks.  I look forward to what comes from him in the future.

10. Playdough, Writer’s Dye: Deux or Die 

One member of the Deepspace5 crew which continues to be one of the best underground Christian hip/hop crews out there.  Playdough likes to have fun and it shows in all of the albums he has out there to date.  This album may, in fact, be one of his more serious albums to date, but don’t let that fool you, he is still Playdough and he set out to re-envision the lyrics of some of the great songs in the history of music.  This is a quality album with excellent beats and a nice pace that never really slows down.

The Violent, Truly, Truly, Do Bear It Away (Reflections on My Year of Gothic Americana)

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"Jesus was the only One that ever raised the dead," The Misfit continued, "and He shouldn’t have done it. He thrown everything off balance. If He did what He said, then it’s nothing for you to do but throw away everything and follow Him, and if He didn’t, then it’s nothing for you to do but enjoy the few minutes you got left the best way you can by killing somebody or burning down his house or doing some other meanness to him. No pleasure but meanness," he said and his voice had become almost a snarl. - Flannery O’Connor, “A Good Man is Hard to Find”

O’Connor was notorious for her descriptions of the “Christ-haunted South” and all of its facade of righteousness, while, beneath it all, was the grotesqueness of sin and distorted creatures.  The above quote is at the crux of all vain questioning of humanity toward God and his mysterious will.  It concerns the ugly glory of Christ’s sacrifice for the enemies of God, who did nothing, in themselves, to merit God’s favor.  This is also at the crux of the curiosity that is the gothic americana musical genre.  A genre that finds its origins in the winter-covered landscapes of Denver, Colorado.  It is a curiosity, indeed, that this Appalachian-bound, doom-and-gloom sound should come from somewhere outside of the Deep South, where hell and damnation sermons and snake-oil salesmen abound.  Nothing sums up the tone and feelings of gothic americana better than the documentary, Searching for the Wrong-Eyed Jesus, which contains talents from my own exploration and others that would fit squarely within the genre itself.

I re-watched that documentary which has a surreal quality to it much like the music the viewer’s travel companion, Jim White, makes (and that gothic americana makes, broadly-speaking).  He becomes our eyes so that we make look on the South in a way that is contemplative, empathetic and understanding, while, at the same time, not depleting the blatant difficulties inherent in that culture.  If you have read any quality American history then there should be some awareness of the complexity of the interplay of religion and the brutal sins and self-perpetuating ghosts of the South.  Jim White, himself, was a transplant to the South from southern California and he, too, recognizes that he is not a true Southerner, but he is empathetic to the complexities of that world and the messy spiritual qualities inherent in it.  I am weaving my year-end gothic americana reflections through this documentary, because it defines the messy spirituality that haunts gothic americana music.  It gives us eyes to see and understand.

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One must understand something about gothic americana music before endeavoring to experience it.  First, it is drenched in Christian allegory and imagery, so much so that, at times, it could easily turn off the most narrow-minded of atheists and agnostics, those who refuse to even see and benefit from the narrative beauty of the story of Christ and the mysteries inherent in it.  Second, this is not "Christian" music.  All of the artists in the genre are not appropriating the imagery in their music as evangelistic propaganda.  They, instead, are endeavoring to appropriate the imagery as a medium for lyrical depth and atmosphere.  David Eugene Edwards (who, also, makes an appearance in Searching for the Wrong-Eyed Jesus) seems to be the main musician in this genre that holds, devoutly, to the propositional truths of Christianity.  And, finally, there is a certain element, or negative approach, that appears in this music which society, in general, shies away from: a low understanding of humanity’s anthropology.  People are not viewed highly in this music.  Most of the time, there are images of sin and corruption that litter the landscape of this music.  With the exception of 16 Horsepower and Wovenhand (and, possibly, a couple others) , there is not much hope presented in response to the worst of humanity.  Don’t expect hope in most of this music.

This is also to say that this music will not be for everybody.  Matter of fact, it has the potential to really polarize opinion between people.  It is not always enjoyable music without putting some time and work into enjoying it.  And, like I said above, these troubadours are not out to make people feel good about their situations and their world.  If you are not feeling a weight or burden after listening to most of this music, then, I would presume, you are not really listening.  I find that I am often melancholy.  My range of emotions is not terribly wide.  My happiness is always tinged with worry, concern, burden and the presence of a dark cloud.  This often displays itself in my interests as well and the people I tend to have friendships with.  I tend toward a darker tint on life, faith, and relationships.  It would not surprise me at all if I was found to have clinical depression if I were tested.  All this to show why this music appeals to me on both a musical and internal level.  I get it; it makes sense to me.  The down side of that is, in the wake of this genres lack of hope, it can feed my melancholy and dark bouts in some very negative ways.  It can turn me too far inward and make me feel as if being depressed and melancholy is the way things should be.  It conflicts with my Christian faith; the gospel of grace tells me that things are not what they should be.  

So most of this music speaks truth, but that truth burdens.  There is no grace to accompany it.  And that is why David Eugene Edwards should be a central figure in the scope of gothic americana music.  It is hard for anyone to argue against DEE’s importance to the genre; in both origin and it being sustained.  Now, this is not to say that there are not other important figures, like Jeffrey-Paul, Jay Munly, and Slim Cessna, but there is something about DEE that gives the genre its heart and impetus.  At this point, other gothic americana fans will probably say that I am giving DEE central place because we are brothers in faith.  We are working within the same faith framework.  And I will not deny that this element plays into it, but to say it is the only reason is to not know me.  And if you want to be shown the truth of that then you have to interact with me, otherwise no argument I give will convince.  DEE is central to this genre.  That is just the way it is.

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The works of 16 Horsepower and Wovenhand (which entails twelve full albums and various live albums and individual songs) is a monolith.  One cannot deal with gothic americana without dealing with the various incarnations of DEE.  Not only that, but his presence is found on the works of other bands in the genre (aka “Whitewashed” on Lilium’s Short Stories and “Dar He Drone” on Jay Munly’s Jimmy Carter Syndrome) and those are standout tracks in every instance.  Something about DEE pushes out the best of all of those he works with.  He is central also because, in his music, he is not satisfied with the truth of the human condition alone; like the rest of the bands seem to be.  He doesn’t offer easy answers or Christian sentimentality; instead he sees the need for hope for something to save us outside of ourselves.  He understands the inconsistency inherent in our nature.  We often see the failures, corruption, rebellion and, even, sin of man (not always our own), and, yet, we think that something in us or in man can fix the problem.  This is the inconsistency that has at the very basic level kept me from ever denying the Christian faith—though I am full of doubts—and I see that solution in everything that is not the gospel; the grace of God.  This is something that DEE gets, also, and, though he finds compliment with the dark tone of the rest of the bands in the genre, he sees the hope of Christ in it all.  The only thing in the world that doesn’t come from us on one level or another.

The brilliance of all of the incarnations of this music whether it be in the original manifestations in Denver, CO or if it is in the descendants of the sound coming from all over the country is its imagery and tone that would make good fodder for the host of post-apocalyptic films out there.  Much like The Police did for mainstreaming Reggae into the realm of rock, gothic americana does for bringing bluegrass and Appalachian influences into the realm of folk music.  This music often reminds me of some Appalachian ram-shackle cabin out in the sticks with older, bearded men with banjos and younger men sipping some moonshine coming straight out the pipe.  The poverty, Pentecostal religion, and folk mythology interplaying and weaving together in a dark and mysterious mystic river flow.  Gothic americana taps into that mystical and truly unexplainable relationship between human nature and faith in the woods of the deep South.  

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This music is important to me in so many ways.  There is something in it that fills in the words of the writers of the South like O’Connor, Percy and Faulkner.  It is a music that expresses the contradictions of the South so well.  It truly is Christ-haunted, the Christ story is all over the blueprints of the music, but it is distorted to the point where it has no power and no grace to give to the undeserving.  Much like the religion of the South, Christ is almost unrecognizable beneath the schemes and corruption of the Pharisees and the prodigals.  Most of this music comes down on the listener like the holy Law comes down on those who cannot live up to its demands.  The music is condemning and does so in a way that misappropriates the Christ story for their purposes.  If Christ was more than a ghost in the South and in gothic americana then grace would ultimately shine through it, but that’s not the South; so if gothic americana showed grace (and, like I said before, it often does in the music of DEE) then the genre as a whole would not be representative with its regional kinship.  DEE stands alone as the representative of the grace-loving believers that seem to be such a minority in the Deep South.  

These bands have tapped into a feeling that is so hard to grasp academically, intellectually, with music which, more often than not, is able to grasp the ineffable elements of knowledge that our reason can’t quite grasp (or refuses to grasp).  Which is why this music is so effective.  It tells the story of people who poor and forgotten, charismatic and pharisaical, tied to the myths of the past and unable to move much beyond them in the future.  This music is a testament to the intricacies of a whole American region and this is exactly why it is the most rigorous, extensive and true formulation of folk/americana music in America at this time.

Top Ten Albums of the Year 

1. Wovenhand - Wovenhand

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2. O’Death - Outside 

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3. Munly & the Lupercalians - Petr & the Wulf

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4. 16 Horsepower - Low Estate

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5. Slim Cessna’s Auto Club - Cipher

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6. Lilium - Transmission of All the Goodbyes

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7. Viarosa - Where The Killers Run

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8. Jay Munly - Jimmy Carter Syndrome

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9. The Builders and The Butchers - Salvation is a Deep, Dark Well

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10. Slim Cessna’s Auto Club - Always Say Please and Thank You

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My heart just drowned in its own happiness.

My heart just drowned in its own happiness.

2012: The End of the World…Week 12

Wovenhand - The Threshingfloor

I think this album was a good follow-up to Ten Stones, because, in one sense, it returns to the ways of the old albums (in that it is less accessible), but, in another sense, it takes the best of the last album and perfects it (the wonderful melodies, simpler song structures).  Is it a better album than the last one? Depends on how you look at it.  The last one was great for the pure visceral thrill of seeing Wovenhand just let go and rock out.  However, this one has graceful melodies (much akin to their first couple of albums) and then allows them to build.  “His Rest” and “Singing Grass” are the best examples of this laid back approach to creating beautifully, atmospheric melodies.  This is just a beautiful album altogether.  However, it still doesn’t come close to the scale of some of the earlier albums.  And I am not quite sure why that is the case.

"The Threshingfloor," "A Holy Measure," "Truth," and "Denver City" grab hold of the propulsion and intensity that Wovenhand has gotten to on several occasions, but there seems to be a more laid-back approach to arriving to those points.  Anyone who has paid attention to their music from the first album can definitely see how this album came to be at the time it did.  It fits within the trajectory of the band, but its still not the best.  On top of that, "Denver City" just seems extremely out of place on this album.  I never minded listening to it (matter of fact, I love that song), but in the scheme of the whole album it is hard to get past the idea that it was simply an afterthought.  The atmosphere, music, and feeling of the record is completely shifted on that last song and, really, without any good reason.  I think ultimately that was truly distracting to me in the end.

Apocalyptic Rating: 2 out of 10 (It was a mere flesh wound)

Wovenhand Album Rankings

1. S/T

2. Consider The Birds

3. Blush Music

4. Ten Stones

5. The Threshingfloor

6. Puur

7. Mosaic

Brought to you by

Denver City by Wovenhand

Admittedly, this song feels a little out of place with the whole of the album, however it is just so damn good that I really didn’t care that it was the odd man out.  It sounds as if they needed one more song for the album and just decided to get together and have fun writing and playing together and this was the result.  It makes you happy at the end of every listen, I guarantee you.

David Eugene Edwards going solo on NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert Series.

Wovenhand live performing “The Threshingfloor”

A Holy Measure by Wovenhand

Directed largely by a joyful sounding percussive beat, the song surrounds the listener in hints of Eastern musical influences.  Edwards’ has, in my opinion, become more comfortable with his voice and how it melds with the music over the years and this song is a good example.  The acoustic elements rival anything that would be found on the newer wave of folk music (The Avett Brothers, Old Crow Medicine Show, Mumford & Sons) and, yet, Wovenhand’s music is still largely unknown in America.  It’s a crying shame.

His Rest by Wovenhand

Just a beautiful melody overall and the simplicity of the lyrics add to the rather flowing nature of the song.  This is a song that would accompany a nice day in a hammock in the Springtime. 

2012: The End of the World…Week 11

Wovenhand - Ten Stones

This album is easily their most accessible work to date.  Musically it is straightforward with lots of rock influence.  Edwards and crew toned down the world music influences that had weaved in and out of their other albums in order to create a sonic album that would appeal to a larger group of people.  Edwards’ lyrics are a lot more discernible, as well, but they are no less beautiful for it.  Those who don’t agree with Edwards’ religious stance may have a harder time taking on this album because the Christian imagery is there in spades in a more apparent fashion (however if you don’t like his perspective, how you were able to choke down the other albums is beyond me).  There are very few slow spots on this album; most of the time, the album rocks just as much as any of the great rock albums in music history.  However, it is still Wovenhand; there is no doubting it. 

The first three songs present the theological theme for the whole album, which is the supremacy of Christ, and all of the other songs are just variations on that theme.  From “Iron Feather” on to the end of the album, there is festering urgency that is carried out through the electric guitars and blunt percussive beats which find their culmination in the the final two tracks, one, “His Loyal Love,” coming off as a chant and the other, “[untitled],” finishes out the album with an instrumental track that starts slows and shifts suddenly into a chaotic rush.  This has the feeling of a concept album without the pretentiousness of a concept album.  There is still enough variation to make it new after many listens. 

The strangest inclusion on the album is their take on the Antonio Carlos Jobim track, “Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars (Corcovado).”  Edwards does his most normal style of singing today.  The gruff is gone, the growl is tamed and he comes off as an, almost, operatic force.  If you weren’t sure that he could actually sing, then here is your proof.  Though the song seems like a strange bedfellow with the rest of this collection, it still fits into the realm of the theme of the album.  Plus, it provides a nice break from the breakneck speed of the rest of the album. 

Apocalyptic Rating: 4 out of 10 (You can step easily out of the bomb shelter)

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